LD 1711 would lift the community solar cap from the current arbitrary limit of 9 to allow up to 200 participants under net metering, with no limit on participants for community solar farms under a competitive process. This bill aims to increase access to community solar, by instating specific targets and policies to assist low- and moderate- income families. It will also use competitive markets to capture low-cost solar, and build on the innovative, bipartisan policy ideas developed in recent years between Maine consumer advocates, solar businesses, and others resulting in at least three hundred megawatts of medium-scale (up to 5 MW) solar installations for communities, municipalities, and businesses.

News Release | Environment Maine/Natural Resources Council of Maine

Bipartisan Bill Would Accelerate Investment In Solar Energy Across Maine

For the last five years Maine has ranked last in New England for solar energy generation and number of solar jobs per capita. A new bipartisan bill that received a public hearing today aims to reverse that trend by accelerating the development of more than 400 megawatts of solar power to serve residents, businesses, and towns across the state.

News Release | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

Portland one of fastest growing cities in the country for solar energy

Portland ranked 25th nationwide for solar energy capacity per capita, landing it among the nation’s leaders for installing clean energy from the sun. The results come from the sixth edition of Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report released today by Environment Maine Research & Policy Center. It is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities.

Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

Shining Cities

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 60 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power nearly one in every 11 homes in America.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

News Release | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

New toolkit provides Maine cities with ten ways to go solar

With local municipalities playing an increasingly important role in the clean energy revolution, Environment Maine Research and Policy Center released a new toolkit today to support cities and towns nationwide in capturing more clean renewable energy from the sun. Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar offers practical ways to take advantage of millions of available rooftops across the country and in Maine.   

Report | Environment Maine Research and Policy Center

Solar Homes

Installing solar panels on all new homes is a common-sense step that would create a wave of clean, renewable energy, reduce dangerous greenhouse gas emissions, cut air pollution, save consumers money and help to create a more resilient electric grid.

News Release | Environment Maine Research & Policy Center

Putting solar panels on new homes could grow Maine’s solar capacity 15-fold

If builders start putting solar panels on all new Maine homes in 2020, the state could increase its current solar power capacity 15-fold by 2045, according to a new report released today by Environment Maine Research & Policy Center.

Report | Environment Maine

Shining Cities 2018: How Smart Local Policies Are Expanding Solar Power in America

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 53 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power 10.1 million homes and 26 times as much capacity as was installed at the end of 2010.[1] Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

News Release | Environment Maine

Governor LePage wrong to veto solar bill

On Monday, Governor LePage vetoed LD 1504, a bill that would have partially restored Maine's net metering policy after the Maine Public Utilities Commission voted to roll it back in January. This means that Maine residents who install solar after January 1, 2018 will still receive less credit for the extra energy they send back to the power grid.

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