Carbon pollution threatens our health

Carbon pollution spewing from power plants threatens Americans' health. Doctors, nurses and scientists warn that it fuels global warming, which triggers poor air quality that makes it harder for children to breathe and contributes to thousands of asthma attacks, heart attacks and other fatal diseases.

Nationwide, smog pollution alone leads to roughly 4,700 premature deaths and 19,000 emergency room visits. Allowing power plants to continue emitting unlimited amounts of carbon pollution will mean more global warming and dirtier air for all of us.

Scientists also warn that global warming is expected to lead to more devastating floods, deadly heat waves and many other threats.

Coal-fired plants need to be cleaned up

Coal-fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon pollution, yet they currently lack any federal limts on their emissions. And the nation's biggest utilities, which have been allowed for decades to spew unlimited amounts of carbon pollution into our air, all while taking in enormous government subsidies, are sure to fight for more of the same. They'll join with the coal companies and spend millions on lobbying and advertising to try and get off the hook for cutting carbon pollution from their dirty power plants.

With your help, we can make history

Enough is enough, and the U.S Environmental Protection Agency agrees. Despite these powerful industry naysayers, the EPA is developing the first-ever carbon pollution standards for new power plants.

Now comes the hard part — getting these standards across the finish line and overcoming the corporate polluters' opposition. So we're working closely with our allies in the public health community, working to rally tens of thousands of activists to stand up for public health and our environment.

It won't be easy, but if enough of us speak out, we can drown out the coal industry lobbyists and make sure EPA is allowed to do its job and protect public health.

Clean Air Updates

News Release | Environment Maine

New Report: Wind Energy Yields Major Environmental Benefits for Maine

Portland, Maine—Wind energy is on the rise in Maine and is providing large environmental benefits for the state, according to a new report released today by Environment Maine. Maine’s wind energy avoided 534,700 metric tons of climate-altering carbon pollution in 2012, which is equivalent to eliminating the pollution from more than 111,000 cars. The report also finds that wind energy reduces smog and soot pollution and saves the nation vast amounts of water.

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News Release | Environment Maine

Opponents rip LePage plan to diminish Maine’s role in anti-smog efforts

Article written by Bangor Daily News' Christopher Cousins

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Headline

Slowing cargo ships cuts pollution near ports by more than half, study finds

Slowing cargo vessels near coastlines by 10 to 15 miles per hour could dramatically cut ships’ air pollution, according to a new study. But only a few U.S. ports have initiated such efforts. A speed limit of 14 mph, down from the current cruising speeds of 25 to 29 mph, would cut nitrogen oxides – a main ingredient of smog – by 55 percent and soot by almost 70 percent. It also would reduce carbon dioxide – a potent greenhouse gas and key contributor to climate change – by 60 percent. With 100,000 ships carrying 90 percent of the world’s cargo, air pollution is a heavy burden for people living near ports, so slowing ships could improve their health, researchers say.

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News Release | Environment Maine

Obama Admin. To Finalize Historic Clean Car Standards

Portland, Maine—The Obama administration today will finalize new clean car standards that will double the fuel efficiency of today’s vehicles by 2025, drastically reducing carbon pollution and cutting oil use in Maine and nationwide.  The standards will cover new cars and light trucks in model years 2017-2025, and require those vehicles to average the equivalent of a 54.5 miles-per-gallon standard by 2025.  A recent joint analysis by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Union of Concerned Scientists projects that in Maine alone the standards will cut carbon pollution by 1.12 million metric tons annually starting in 2030—the equivalent of the annual pollution from 170,000 of today’s vehicles—and save 95 million gallons of fuel each year.  

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Report | Environment Maine Research & Policy Institute

A Record of Leadership

Over the last decade, northeastern states have built a track record of successful action to reduce global warming pollution. By working together across state lines and partisan divides—and  developing innovative new policies to hasten the transition to a clean energy economy—the Northeast has succeeded in cutting emissions while safeguarding the region’s economic health.

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